Murder of a People!

Mohawk Residential school deaths were common and have been linked to the persistence of poorly constructed and maintained facilities. The actual number of deaths remains unknown due to inconsistent reporting by school officials and the destruction of medical and administrative records in compliance with retention and disposition policies for government records. Research by the TRC revealed that at least 6,000 students had died, mostly from disease. Other estimates place the death toll at three times that number and some in the tens of thousands.
The 1906 Annual Report of the Department of Indian Affairs, submitted by chief medical officer Peter Bryce, highlighted that the “Indian population of Canada has a mortality rate of more than double that of the whole population, and in some provinces more than three times”.[4]:97–98[48]:275 Among the list of causes he noted tuberculosis and the role residential schools played in spreading the disease by way of poor ventilation and medical screening
In 1909, Bryce reported that, between 1894 and 1908, mortality rates at some residential schools in western Canada ranged from 30% to 60% over five years (that is, five years after entry, 30% to 60% of students had died, or 6–12% per annum).[49] These statistics did not become public until 1922, when Bryce, who was no longer working for the government, published The Story of a National Crime: Being a Record of the Health Conditions of the Indians of Canada from 1904 to 1921. In particular, he alleged that the high mortality rates could have been avoided if healthy children had not been exposed to children with tuberculosis.[4][50][51] At the time, no antibiotic had been identified to treat the disease, and this exacerbated the impact of the illness. Streptomycin, the first effective treatment, was not introduced until 1943.[20]:381
In 1920 and 1922, Regina physician F. A. Corbett was commissioned to visit the schools in the west of the country, and found similar results to those reported by Bryce. At the Ermineskin school in Hobbema, Alberta, he found 50% of the children had tuberculosis.[14]:98 At Sarcee Boarding School near Calgary, he noted that all 33 students were “much below even a passable standard of health” and “[a]ll but four were infected with tuberculosis”.[14]:99 In one classroom, he found 16 ill children, many near death, who were being made to sit through lessons.[14]:99

Cairn erected in 1975 marking the Battleford Industrial School cemetery
In 2011, reflecting on the TRC’s research, Justice Murray Sinclair told the Toronto Star: “Missing children—that is the big surprise for me … That such large numbers of children died at the schools. That the information of their deaths was not communicated back to their families.”[52]
Missing children and unmarked graves[edit source]
The TRC concluded that it may be impossible to ever identify the number of deaths or missing children, in part because of the habit of burying students in unmarked graves.[53][54][55] The work is further complicated by a pattern of poor record keeping by school and government officials, who neglected to keep reliable numbers about the number of children who died or where they were buried.[6] While most schools had cemeteries on site, their location and extent remain difficult to determine as cemeteries that were originally marked were found to have been later razed, intentionally hidden or built over.[55][56]
The fourth volume of the TRC’s final report, dedicated to missing children and unmarked burials, was developed after the original TRC members realized, in 2007, that the issue required its own working group. In 2009, the TRC requested $1.5 million in extra funding from the federal government to complete this work, but was denied.[6] The researchers concluded, after searching land near schools using satellite imagery and maps, that, “for the most part, the cemeteries that the Commission documented are abandoned, disused, and vulnerable to accidental disturbance”.[57]:

Iroquois Indian

The Ohio Treaty and The Iroquois Indians became a part of
Ohio’s History
“HAUDENOSAUNEE”
By Delana Forsyth and my mother Delana Baldwin
The name “Iroquois” is French variant on a term for “snake” given by the Hurons. There were other tribes who spoke the same language, but who were not part of the confederacy. The Erie natives had been related to the Iroquois. They lived east shore Lake Erie in New York and Pennsylvania. The Iroquois Confederacy considered them enemies and wiped them all out.
By 1650, the Iroquois began to push their way into the rich Ohio Country between the Great Lakes and the Ohio River. They conquered and drove out various natives living in the area. The resulting in wars known as the Beaver Wars (1650-1700 A.D.) because the Iroquois wanted more land for hunting and trapping beavers and deer. The participated in the fur trade with the Dutch and the English. Unlike many other tribes east of the Mississippi, most of the Iroquois Nation didn’t favor the French over the English. A small group of Mohawks and Onondagas converted to Catholicism and aided the French. A small number of Iroquois lived in modern-day Ohio, only several hundred at a time, only for hunting. There had been some who stayed and developed their own political system and separated themselves entirely from the ways of life of the east. With said, I have discovered the Mohawk Tribe of Ohio.
I have been blessed to be born of American Indian blood, my blood is of the nation Iroquois. If you look up the history of the Iroquois the American constitution has been taken from many of our ways and beliefs. With that said, I have been studying my family history all my life. There is so much history in my family to be able to write things I am. it has been an adventure for me a long the way along with many tears. To talk to my mother and find out that there had been slavery in my family as well eats at me. In school, we are taught about black slavery, NO ONE EVER TALKS ABOUT THE ABUSE AND SLAVERY MY PEOPLE THE AMERICAN INDIAN HAVE SUFFERED.
The women more so. Men are men no matter what color you are. My grandmother had been sold to my grandfather. Whom happened to be 20 years older and only two children lived out of seven my mother and one aunt.
Iroquois Women
The Heart of the Nation
“There is nothing more real than the
Superiority of the women. It is they who constitute
The tribe, transmit the nobility blood,… and perpetuate
The family. The possess all actual authority; own the land, and
The fields and their harvest; they are the soul of the councils,
The arbiters of peace and war; they have care of the public treasury;
[captives] are given them; they arrange marriages; the children belong to them and their blood confined the line of descent and the order of inheritance.”
By: Joseph-Francois Lafitau
1724

Than one day I came across Ohio. I had been surprised by what I had read. Here is what I had found on the internet about Fort Greenville.
The treaty of Fort Greenville was signed on August 3, 1795. At fort Greenville what is now Greenville, Ohio; it followed negotiations, (which means lie in white language) after the American Indian loss at the Battle of Fallen Timbers a year earlier. It ended the Northwest Indian war in the Ohio country and limited strategic parcels of land to the north and east. (which again was robbed from us by white lies). The parties to the treaty were a coalition of American Indian Tribes, known as the Western Confederacy, and the United States government represented by General Anthony Wayne for local frontiersmen.
Whom, Toledo’s Anthony Wayne Trail is named.
The treaty is considered “the beginning of modern Ohio history.”
The treaty established what became known as the Greenville Treaty Line, which was for several years a boundary between the Indian Territory and land stolen by the White Europeans. The latter American thieves frequently disregarded the treaty, (we got punished for white people wrongs). The treaty line to encroach on American Indian land. The treaty was also established the “annuity system: this is where the yearly grants of federal money and supplies of calico cloth came in to the Indians, and institutionalized continuing government influence in the tribe’s affairs giving outside considerable control over the Indian life in Ohio. the treaty of Greenville, also called a treaty of Fort Greenville, on the same date settlement between whites and the Indians. Indian confederation headed by Miami Chief Little Turtle by which the Indians ceded most of the future state of Ohio and significant portion of what would be the states of Michigan, Indiana, and Illinois.
As whites moved into the Northwest territory in the years following the American revolution their advance was opposed by lose of alliance was mainly Algonquian speaking people. This subject will need to come in another article. The Shawnee and the Delaware to the whites. Their Indian name is Linni Lenape or Lenape. These tribes pushed from New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, to Ohio. both whom have been driven west by prior territorial encroachments, joined the Ottawa, Ojibwa, Miami, and Potawatomi in the Northwest Indian confederation, led by Little Turtle, the American Indian confederation skirmished with settlers and Kentucky militia in the late 1780’s.
In the effort to pacify the region and the stake a concussive claim to areas that had been ceded by the British under the terms of the peace of Paris (1783), a series of expeditions were dispatched in the Northwest Territory. The first under General Josiah Harmer, was routed in a pair of engagements in October 1790. The second, led by Northwest Territory governor Arthur St Clair, was crushed on November 4, 1791 in one of the worst defeats ever suffered by the United States military against an American Indian force. Not much is ever talked about the victories of the American Indians. Because whites are always ashamed for defeat when it comes their ass being handed to them. SMILING.
Emboldened by victories and promise of support from the British, who still occupied strategic forts within the Northwest territory, the confederacy appeared to have checked the American advance. In, 1792 President George Washington appointed General “Mad” Anthony Wayne as commander of the United States Army and tasked him with crushing the resistance. Unlike the previous expeditions which relied heavily on militia troops. Wayne’s force consisted of professional, seasoned infantry. On August 20, 1794, Wayne’s 2000 regulars supplemented, by 1000 mounted Kentucky militia, met 2000 of the confederations warriors near Fort Miami (southwest of modern day Toledo).
In the ensuing Battle of Fallen Timbers. Wayne’s troops had broken the Indian line and the warriors fled. The defeat was compounded by the evaporation of support from the British, which had since become entangled in the French Revolutionary wars and did not wish to risk a confrontation with the United States. Within months of Fallen Timbers, Britain made clear its intentions with the Jay treaty November 19, 1794, wherein it promised to evacuate its forts in the Northwest territory. Beaten in battle and with np prospect of outside assistance, the confederation agreed to terms set forth by the Americans.
On August 3, 1794, Wayne, Little turtle, and their delegations met at Fort Greenville. To conclude the treaty. Both sides agree to a termination of hostilities and exchange of orisons a redefinition of border between the United States and Indian lands. By the term of the treaty, the confederation ceded all lands east and south of a boundary that began at the mouth of the Cuyahoga (in modern day Cleveland) and south to Fort Laurens (modern day Bolivan, Ohio) and then west to Fort Recovery. The boundary then continued south west to the point at which the Kentucky River emptied into the Ohio River. (modern day Carrollton, Kentucky). In addition, the United States was granted strategically significant parcels of land to the North and west of this line, including the sites of the modern cities of Fort Wayne and Lafayette Indiana; Chicago, Illinois; and Toledo Ohio. the treaty also ceded Mackinac Island and its environs, as well as a large track of land encompassing much of the area of modern metropolitan Detroit. After the signing of the treaty. Little advocated cooperation with the United States was not there to keep any order. They got what they wanted once the theft had already been done there was no going back. Tecumsech, who stated that the so-called peace chiefs had given away the land that they not own. All Indian nations understood we did not own the land. We are made of dust and the Great Spirit gives us life. Not all the great Chief, wanted any treaty. They were ready to fight to keep what they had.
Tecumseh had led a brilliant campaign against the Americans during the War of 1812, his death of 1813 and the disintegration spelled the effective end of organized Indian resistance in the known at the time as the Western Confederacy.

Mohawk Institute Residential School
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The Mohawk Institute in 2013
The Mohawk Institute Residential School was a Canadian Indian residential school in Brantford, Ontario, Canada. The School operated under the Government of Canada from July 1, 1885 to June 27, 1970. Prior to 1885 the Anglican Church of Canada was involved in the operation of a school and residential school in the same location. Enrollment at the school ranged from 90 to 200 students per year.

Contents [hide]
1
History
2 It was operated by the Anglican Church of Canada from its founding as the “Mechanics’ Institute” (a day school for boys on the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve) in 1828 until 1969, when control was handed over to the Canadian federal government.[1] The Mohawk Institute was established on 350-acres of farm land, all of which were or had been part of the land of Six Nations at some point.[2]
In 1831, the school began to function as a residential school for boys, and starting in 1834, girls were taken in as boarders as well.[1] Children from Six Nations were sent there, along with some from the New Credit, and Moraviantown, Sarnia, Walpole Island, Muncey, Scugog, Stoney Point, Saugeen, Bay of Quinte and Kahnawake reserves.
While the school was originally nearby the Mohawk village, in 1837 the colonial government of Upper Canada ordered Six Nation residents to resettle south of the Grand River, kilometers from the school.[1] Between 1854–1859, the building was destroyed by fire and rebuilt a few hundred meters from its original location.[1] Around the same time, the school acquired more land, and farming became a prominent part of life for children at the school. In 1885, the year after the Indian Act made enrollment compulsory for Status Indian children under 16,[3] the school began to accept students from reserves beyond Six Nations.[1]
On April 19, 1903, the main school building was again destroyed by fire. On May the barns of the Mohawk School were also destroyed by fire. On June 24, 1903 the playhouse which had been serving as the boys’ dorm since the main fire in April was also burned down. All three of these fires have been attributed to students at the school.[4] The school buildings were rebuilt the following year. The new school building contained separate boys and girls wings, principal’s and teachers quarters, as well as administrative offices.[1] This new school building was designed to hold 150 students and also included the development of barns, stables, and other agriculture related out buildings.[2]
In 1922, the management of the school was formally taken over by the Canadian government, though the Anglican church retained ownership, and the agreement required that the principal be Anglican.[1] A chapel was added to the school in 1930.[2] By 1955, enrollment reached 185 children.[1]
In 1963, farming was discontinued as the children were now given a full day of education without requiring their manual labour.[1] Enrollment decreased as schools were built in reserve throughout Ontario, and in 1970, the school was closed. Six Nations assumed ownership of the building the following year.
Abuse[edit source]

Abuse
3
Principals
4
Present Day
5
Artistic Works
6
See also
7
References

History[edit source]

Mohawk Institute ca.1932
It was operated by the Anglican Church of Canada from its founding as the “Mechanics’ Institute” (a day school for boys on the Six Nations of the Grand River reserve) in 1828 until 1969, when control was handed over to the Canadian federal government.[1] The Mohawk Institute was established on 350-acres of farm land, all of which were or had been part of the land of Six Nations at some point.[2]
In 1831, the school began to function as a residential school for boys, and starting in 1834, girls were taken in as boarders as well.[1] Children from Six Nations were sent there, along with some from the New Credit, and Moraviantown, Sarnia, Walpole Island, Muncey, Scugog, Stoney Point, Saugeen, Bay of Quinte and Kahnawake reserves.
While the school was originally nearby the Mohawk village, in 1837 the colonial government of Upper Canada ordered Six Nation residents to resettle south of the Grand River, kilometers from the school.[1] Between 1854–1859, the building was destroyed by fire and rebuilt a few hundred meters from its original location.[1] Around the same time, the school acquired more land, and farming became a prominent part of life for children at the school. In 1885, the year after the Indian Act made enrollment compulsory for Status Indian children under 16,[3] the school began to accept students from reserves beyond Six Nations.[1]
On April 19, 1903, the main school building was again destroyed by fire. On May the barns of the Mohawk School were also destroyed by fire. On June 24, 1903 the playhouse which had been serving as the boys’ dorm since the main fire in April was also burned down. All three of these fires have been attributed to students at the school.[4] The school buildings were rebuilt the following year. The new school building contained separate boys and girls wings, principal’s and teachers quarters, as well as administrative offices.[1] This new school building was designed to hold 150 students and also included the development of barns, stables, and other agriculture related out buildings.[2]
In 1922, the management of the school was formally taken over by the Canadian government, though the Anglican church retained ownership, and the agreement required that the principal be Anglican.[1] A chapel was added to the school in 1930.[2] By 1955, enrollment reached 185 children.[1]
In 1963, farming was discontinued as the children were now given a full day of education without requiring their manual labour.[1] Enrollment decreased as schools were built in reserve throughout Ontario, and in 1970, the school was closed. Six Nations assumed ownership of the building the following year.
Abuse[edit source]
the Abuse that was happeningMany former students have described suffering physical, sexual and emotional abuse at the school.[5][6][7] The poor quality of food served to students led to the school’s nickname, The Mush Hole.
In 1914 two former students from the Mohawk School charged the school’s principal for cutting off their hair, imprisonment, and physical abuse. The case went to trial on March 31, 1914 where the students were awarded $400 for two of the claims and the Principal was fined.[4]
Formal complaints were registered against the school and staff relating to physical abuse, the use of the strap, and quality of food by students and parents of students in 1937, 1951, 1955, and 1965.[4]

Present Day[edit source]
Following the closure of the Mohawk Institute in 1970 the Woodland Cultural Centre opened on the site in 1972, as an organization focused on research, history, and later the arts.[8] Woodland’s cultural and historical interpretation programming utilizes the historic Mohawk Institute building to teach about the history of residential schools in Canada.[9]
In 2013 a leak in the roof of the residential school building caused significant damage to the historic site. As a result of this leak a community input process was established within Six Nations of the Grand River to determine what the local community wanted to do with the building, 98% of participants voted to save the historic building.[10] In March 2014 the “Save the Evidence” campaign was started to raise money to preserve the Mohawk Institute and to raise awareness about the history of residential schools.[8]

Artistic Works[edit source]
The history and student experience at the Mohawk Institute has contributed to the works of a number of authors and artists including:
Graham, Elizabeth (1997). The Mush Hole: Life at Two Indian Residential Schools. Waterloo, Ontario: Heffle Publishing. ISBN 0-9683179-0-1.
Harper, Maddie (1993). “Mush-hole” Memories of a Residential School. Carlos Freire. Toronto, Ontario: The Turtle Island Publication Group. ISBN 0-920813-98-4.
“Mush Hole Remembered: R.G. Miller”, a series of paintings by artist R.G. Miller based on his experience as a student at the Mohawk Institute.[11]
“Opening Doors to Dialogue” community art project led by Samuel Thomas and the Woodland Cultural Centre used the physical building of the Mohawk Institute as inspiration for a community dialogue, healing, and art.[12]

Iroquois Language;

OKAYONDONGHSERA YONDENNASE

OGHENTONH kARIGHWATEGHKWENH:

Onenth weghniserade wakatyerenkowa desawennawenrate ne kenteyurhoton. Desahahishonne donwenghratstanyonne ne kentekaghronghwayon. Tesatkaghtoghserontye ronatennossendonghkwe yonkwanikonghtaghkwenne, konyennetaghkwen. Ne katykenh nayoyaneratye ne sanikonra? Daghsatkaghtoghseronne ratiyanarenyon onkwaghsotsherashonkenhha; neok detkanoron ne shekonh ayuyenkwaroghthake jiratighrotonghkwakwe. Ne katykenh nayuyaneratye ne sanikonra desakaghserentonyonne?
Niyawehkowa katy nonwa onenh skennenji thisayatirhehon. Onenh nonwa oghseronnih denighroghkwayen. Hasekenh thiwakwekonh deyunennyatenyon nene konnerhonyon, “Ie henskerighwaghtonte.” Kenyutnyonkwaratonnyon, neony kenyoydakarahon, neony kenkontifaghsoton. Nedens aesayatyenenghdon, konyennedaghkwen, neony kenkaghnekonyon nedens aesayatyeneghdon, knoyennethaghkwen, neony kenwaseraketotanese kentewaghsatayenha kanonghsakdatye. Niyateweghniserakeh yonkwakaronny; onidatkon yaghdekeonghsonde oghsonterraghkowa nedens aesayatyenenghdon, konyennethaghkwen.
Niyawenhkowa kady nonwa onenh skennenjy thadesarhadiyakonh. Hasekenh kanoron jinayawenhon nene aesahhahiyenenhon, nene ayakotyerenhon ayakawen, “Issy tyeyadakeron, akwah deyakonakorondon!” Ayakaweron oghnonnekenh niyuterenhhatye, konyennedaghkwen.
Rotirighwison onkwaghsotshera, ne ronenh, “Kenhenyondatsjistayenhaghse. Kendeyughnyonkwarakda eghtenyontatitenrany orighokonha.” Kensane yeshotiriwayen orighwakwekonh yatenkarighwentaseron, nene akwah denyontatyadoghseronko. Neony ne ronenh, “Ethononweh yenontatenonshine, kanakdakwenniyukeh yenyontatideron.”
Onenh kady iese sewweyenghskwe sathaghyonnighson:
Karhatyonni.
Oghskawaserenhon.
Gentiyo.
Onenyute.
Deserokenh.
Deghhodijinharakwenh.
Oghrekyonny.
Deyuywenton.
Etho ne niwa ne akotthaghyonnishon.

  1. Onenh nene shehaawah deyakodarakeh ranyaghdenghshon:
    Kaneghsadakeh.
    Onkwehieyede.
    Waghkerhon.
    Kahhendohhon.
    Dhogwenyoh.
    Kayyhekwarakeh.
    Etho ne niwa ne rayaghdenshon.
  2. Onenh nene jadadeken roskerewake:
    Deyaokenh.
    Jonondese.
    Otskwirakeron.
    Onaweron.
  3. Onenh nene onghwa kehaghshonha:
    Karhawenghradongh.
    Karahenh.
    Deyuhhero.
    Deyughsweken.
    Oxdenkeh.
    Etho ne niwa roghskerewake.
    Eghnikatakeghne orighwakayongh.
  4. Ne kaghyaton jinikawennakeh ne dewadadenonweronh, “Konyennedaghkwen, onenh weghniserade yonkwatkennison. Rawenniyo rawweghniseronnyh. Ne onwa konwende yonkwatkennison nene jinkiyuneghrakwah jinisayadawen. Onenh onghwenjakonh niyonsakahhawe jinonweh nadkakaghneronnyonghhwe. Akwah kady okaghserakonh thadetyatroghkwanekenh.
  5. “Onenh kady yakwenronh, wakwennyonkoghde okaghsery, akwah kady ok skennen thadenseghsatkagh-thonnyonhheke.
    11.”Nok ony kanekhere deyugsihharaonh ne sahondakon. Onenh kady watyakwaghsiharako waahkwadeweyendonh tsisaronkatah, kady nayawenh ne skennen thensathondeke enhtyewenninekenneh.
  6. “Nok ony kanekhere deyughsihharaonh desanyatokenh. Onenh kady hone yakwenronh watyakwaghsihharanko, akwah kady ok skennen deghsewnninekenne dendewadatenonghweradon.
  7. Onenh are oya, konennethaghkwen. Nene kadon yuneghrakwah jinesadawen. Niyadeweghniserakeh saniyeskahhaghs; ken-ony saderesera. Akwagh kady ok onekwenghdarihengh thisennekwakenry.
  8. Onenh kady yakwenronh wak\wanekwenghdarokewanyon jisanakdade, ogh kady nenyawenne seweghniserathagh ne akwah skennen then kanakdiyuhake ji enghsitskodake denhsatkaghdonnyonheke.
  9. Onenh nene Karenna,
    Yondonghs “Aihaigh.”

Kayanerenh deskenonghweronne;
Kheyadawenh deskenonghweronne;
Oyenkondonh deskenonghweronne;
Wakonnyh deskenonghweronne.
Ronkeghsotah rotirighwane,-
Ronkeghsota jiyathondek.

!6. Enskat ok enjerennokden nakwah oghnaken nyare enyonghdentyonko kanonghsakonghshon, enyairon:

  1. ” A-i Raxhottahyh! Ne ji onenh wakarighwakayonne ne sewarighwisahnonghkwe ne kayarenghkowah. Ayawenhenstokenghske daondayakotthondeke.
  2. “Na-i Raxhottahyh! Ne kenne iesewenh enyakodenghthe nene noghnaken enyakaonkodaghkwe.
  3. “Na-i Raxhottahyh! Onenh nonwa kathonghnonweh dhatonghdaghwanyon jienghnonhon nitthati-righwayerathaghke.”
  4. “Na-i Raxhottahyh! Nene ji onenh wakarighwakayonne ne sewarighwisahnonghkwe, ne Kayarenghkowa. Yejisewatkonserghkwayon onghwenjakonshon yejiewayadakeron, sewarighsahnhonkwe ne Kayanerenhkowah. Ne sanekenh aerengh niyenghhenwe enyurighwadatye Kayanerenghkowah.”

  1. Eghnikonh enyerighwawetharho kenthoh, are enjondernnoden enskat enjerenokden, onenh ethone enyakohetsde onenh are enjondentyyonko kanonghsakonghshon, enyairon wahhy:
  2. “A-i Raxhotthahyh! Onenh jattondek kady nonwa jinihhotiyerenh, – orghwakwekoinh natehaotiyadoreghtonh, nene roneronh ne enyononghsaghniratston. A-i Raxhotthahyh! nene ronenh: ‘Onen nonwa wetewayennendane; wetewennakeraghdanyon; watidewennakarondonnyon.’
  3. Onenh are oya eghdeshotiyadoreghdonh, nene ronenh: Kenkisenh nenyawenne. Aghsonh thiyenjidewatyenghsaeke, onok enjonkwanekheren.’ Nene ronenh: “Kenkine nenyawanne. Agsonh denyakokwanentonghsaeke, onok denjontadenakarondako. Nene doka ok yadayakonakarondatye onghwenjakonh niyaonsakahawe, A-i Raxhottahyh,’ nene ronenh, ‘da-edewenhheye onghteh, neok yadayakonakarondatye onghwenjakonh niyaonsakahawe.’
  4. “Onenh are oya eghdeshodiyadoregghtonh, nai Raxhottahyh! Nene ronenh ne enyononghsaghniratston. Nene ronengh: ‘Doka onwa Keneyondatyadawenghdate, ne kenkarenyakeghrondonhah ne nayakoghstonde ne nayeghnyasakenradake, ne kenh ne iesewenh, kenkine nenyawenne. Kendenyethirentyinnite kanhonghdakde dewaghsadayenhah.
  5. “Onenh are oya eghdejisewayudoreghdonh, nene isewenh: ‘Yahhonghdehdeyoyanere nene kenwedewayen, onwa enyeken nonkwaderesera; kadykenh niyakoghswathah, akwekonh nityakawenonhtonh ne kenyoteranen-tenyonhah. Enyonterenjiok kendonsayedane akwah enyakonewarontye, onok enyerighwanendon oghnikawenhonh ne kendeyeretyonny; katykenh nenyakorane nen-yerighwanendon akare onenh enyakodokenghse. Onok na entkaghwadasehhon nakonikonra, onenh are ne eh enjonkwakaronny.’
  6. “Onenh are oya eghdeshotiyadoreghdonh, nene ronenh: ‘Kenkine nenyawenne. Endewghneghdotako skarenhhesekowah, enwadonghwenjadethare eghyendewasenghte tyoghnawtenghjihonh kathonghdeh thinenkahhawe; onenh denghnon dentidewagneghdoten, onenh denghnon yaghnonwendonh thiyaensayeken nonkwateresera.’
  7. “Onenh are oya eghdeshotiyadoreghonh, nene roneronh wedewaweyennendane; wedewennakerghdanyon. Doka nonkenh onghwajok onok enjonkwanekheren. Ken kady ne nenyawenne. Kenhendewaghatatsherodarho ken kanakaryonniha deyunhonghdoyenghdongh yendewanaghsenghde, kennikonghkahdeh. Enwadon ok jiyudakenrokde thadenyedane dogkara nentyewwnninekenne enjondatenikonghketsko ne enyenikonghkwenghdarake. Onokna enjeyewendane yenjonthahida ne kayanereghkowa.’
  8. “Onenh kady ise jadakweniyu ken Kanonghsyonny, Dekanawidah, ne degniwenniyu ne rohhawah Odadsheghte; onenh nene yeshodonnyh Wathadodarho; onenh nene yeshohowah akahenyonh; onare nene yeshodonnyh Kanyadariyu; onenh nen yeshonarase Shdekaronyes; onenh nene onghwa kehhaghsaonhah yejodenaghstahhere kanghsdajikowah.”

  1. Onenh jattondek sewarihwisaanonghkwe Kayarenhkowah. Onenh wakarighwakayonne. Onenh ne okne joskawayendon. Yetsisewanenyadanyon ne sewariwisaanonghkweh. Yejisewahhawihtonh, yetsisewennits-karahgwanyon; agwah neok ne skaendayendon. Etho yetsisewanonwadaryon. Sewarihwisaanonghkwe yetsisewahhawitonh. Yetsisewatgonserghkwanyon sewarihwisaanonghkwe, Kayanerehkowah.
  2. Onenh kady jattondek jadakweniyosaon sewarihwisaanonghkwe:

DEKARIHAOKENH!
Jatthontenyonk!
Jatagweniyosaon,

AYONHWAHTHA!
Jatthontenyonk!
Jatagweniyosaon.

SHATEKARIWATE
Etho natejonhne!
Sewaterihwakhaonghwe,
Sewarihwisaanonghwe,
Kayanerehkowah.

  1. Jatthontenyonk!
    Jatagweniyosaon,
    SHARENHAOWANE!
    Jatthontenyonk!
    jatagweniyosaon,
    DEYONNEHGONH!
    Jatthontenyonk!
    Jatagweniyosaon,

History of The Ohio Treaty, Education into Ohio’s history.

I have been blessed to be born of American Indian blood, my blood is of Iroquosis. If you look up the history of the Iroqusis the American constitution has been taken from many of our ways and beliefs. With that said, I have been studying my family history all my life. There is so much history and it has been an adventure for me along with many tears. To talk to my mother and find out that there had been slavery in my family eats at me. In school, we are taught about black slavery, NO ONE EVER TALKS ABOUT THE ABUSE AND SLAVERY MY PEOPLE, WE HAVE SUFFERED. 

Iroquois Women

The Heart of the Nation

“There is nothing more real than the

Superiority of the women. It is they who constitute 

The tribe, transmit the nobility blood,… and perpetuate 

The family. The possess all actual authority; own the land, and

The fields and their harvest; they are the soul of the councils,

The arbiters of peace and war; they have care of the public treasury; 

[captives] are given them; they arrange marriages; the children belong to them and their blood confined the line of descent and the order of inheritance.”

By: Joseph-Francois Lafitau

1724

  Than one day I came across Ohio. I had been surprised by what I had read. Here is what I had found on the internet about Fort Greenville.

The treaty of Fort Greenville was signed on August 3, 1795. At fort Greenville what is now Greenville, Ohio; it followed negotiations, (which means lie in white language) after the American Indian loss at the Battle of Fallen Timbers a year earlier. It ended the Northwest Indian war in the Ohio country and limited strategic parcels of land to the north and east. (which again was robbed from us by white lies). The parties to the treaty were a coalition of American Indian Tribes, known as the Western Confederacy, and the United States government represented by General Anthony Wayne for local frontiersmen.

Whom, Toledo’s Anthony Wayne Trail is named.

The treaty is considered “the beginning of modern Ohio history.” 

The treaty established what became known as the Greenville Treaty Line, which was for several years a boundary between the Indian Territory and land stolen by the White Europeans. The latter American thieves frequently disregarded the treaty, (we got punished for white people wrongs). The treaty line to encroach on American Indian land. The treaty was also established the “annuity system: this is where the yearly grants of federal money and supplies of calico cloth came in to the Indians, and institutionalized continuing government influence in the tribes affairs giving outside considerable control over the Indian life in Ohio. the treaty of Greenville, also called a treaty of Fort Greenville, on the same date settlement between whites and the Indians. Indian confederation headed by Miami Cheif Little Trutle by which the Indians ceded most of the future state of Ohio and significant portion of what would be the states of Michigan, Indiana, and Illinois. 

As whites moved into the Northwest territory in the years following the American revolution their advance was opposed by lose of alliance was mainly Alogonquian speaking people. This subject will need to come in another article. The Shawnee and the Delaware to the whites. Their Indian name is Linni Lenape or Lenape. These tribes pushed from New York, Pennsylvania, and New Jersey, to Ohio. both whom have been driven west by prior territorial encroachments, joined the Ottawa, Ojibwa, Miami, and Potawatomi in the Northwest Indian confederation, led by Little Turtle, the American Indian confederation skirmished with settlers and Kentucky militia in the late 1780’s.

In the effort to pacify the region and the stake a concussive claim to areas that had been ceded by the British under the terms of the peace of Paris (1783), a series of expeditions were dispatched in the Northwest Territory. The first under General Josiah Harmer, was routed in a pair of engagements in October 1790. The second, led by Northwest Territory governor Arthur St Clair, was crushed on November 4, 1791 in one of the worst defeats ever suffered by the United States military against a American Indian force. Not much is ever talked about the victories of the American Indians. Because whites are always ashamed for defeat when it comes their ass being handed to them. SMILING.

Emboldened by victories and promise of support from the British, who still occupied strategic forts within the Northwest territory, the confederacy appeared to have checked the American advance. In, 1792 President George Washington appointed General “Mad” Anthony Wayne as commander of the United States Army and tasked him with crushing the resistance. Unlike the previous expeditions which relied heavily on militia troops. Wayne’s force consisted of professional, seasoned infantry. On August 20, 1794, Wayne’s 2000 regulars supplemented, by 1000 mounted Kentucky militia, met 2000 of the confederations warriors near Fort Miami (southwest of modern day Toledo).

In the ensuing Battle of Fallen Timbers. Wayne’s troops had broken the Indian line and the warriors fled. The defeat was compounded by the evaporation of support from the British, which had since become entangled in the French Revolutionary wars and did not wish to risk a confrontation with the United States. Within months of Fallen Timbers, Britain made clear its intentions with the Jay treaty November 19, 1794, wherein it promised to evacuate its forts in the Northwest territory. Beaten in battle and with np prospect of outside assistance, the confederation agreed to terms set forth by the Americans. 

On August 3, 1794, Wayne, Little turtle, and their delegations met at Fort Greenville. To conclude the treaty. Both sides agree to a termination of hostilities and exchange of orisons a redefinition of border between the United States and Indian lands. By the term of the treaty, the confederation ceded all lands east and south of a boundary that began at the mouth of the Cuyahoga (in modern day Cleveland) and south to Fort Laurens (modern day Bolivan, Ohio) and then west to Fort Recovery. The boundary then continued south west to the point at which the Kentucky River emptied into the Ohio River. (modern day Carrollton, Kentucky). In addition, the United States was granted strategically significant parcels of land to the North and west of this line, including the sites of the modern cities of Fort Wayne and Lafayette Indiana; Chicago, Illinois; and Toledo Ohio. the treaty also ceded Mackinac Island and its environs, as well as a large track of land encompassing much of the area of modern metropolitan Detroit. After the signing of the treaty. Little advocated cooperation with the United States was not there to keep any order. They got what they wanted once the theft had already been done there was no going back. Tecumsech, who stated that the so-called peace chiefs had given away the land that they not own. Not all the great Chief, wanted any treaty. They were ready to fight to keep what they had.

Tecumseh had led a brilliant campaign against the Americans during the War of 1812, his death of 1813 and the disintegration spelled the effective end of organized Indian resistance in the known at the time as the Western Confederacy.

When you see our American Constitution, you will see the Iroquois Confederacy is copied.

Blessed to Be Light!

This week I learned a little about myself. Scripture frequently mentions light in association with God. In Genesis, He called light good (1:3-4); in Psalms, David looked to the Lord for light and salvation (27:1); in John’s gospel, Jesus proclaimed Himself to be the light of the world (8:12). We find light mentioned in many other passages, and it continues in and through our lives today. But, how? This month we will discuss:

Our call to lives as children of light.

How God’s Word guides us.

His light in the darkness.

The way to share His light.

“Blessed is the Nation Whose God is the LORD.” PSALM 33:12

America was founded on godly principles rooted in God’s eternal Word. Freedom is God’s idea, and implanted within every human heart by the Creator who made them is the yearning to be free. Leviticus 25:10, inscribed on our Liberty Bell says, “Proclaim liberty throughout all the land unto all the inhabitants thereof.”

The golden, majestic appearance of our Declaration of Indepedence – the parchment paper, the resolute signatures of those who represented the voice of a new nation, and the rich content of this anointed document, bears testimony to the powerful faith which underscored the conviction on which our Indepedence is based: “the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God that all men are created equal, and they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights…. appealing to Supreme Judge of the world…”

Further evidence of the powerful faith of our earliest leaders can be seen in the content of their state constitutions, penned by some of the same men who wrote the Declaration of Indepedence. The Delaware document, for example, written by Thomas McKean. A signer of the Declaration of Indepedence and the Articles of Confederation, and George Read, also signer of Declaration of Indepedence and the Constitution of the United States, says, “Every person who shall be chosen a member of either house, or appointed to any office or places of trust, before taking his seat, or entering upon the execution of his office, shall take the following oath: “I do profess faith in God the Father, and in Jesus Christ His only Son, and the Holy Spirit, one God, blessed for ever more; and I do acknowledge the Holy Scriptures of the Old and New Testament to be given by Divine Inspiration.”

Tears Often Become Trails to Christ!

We’re living in a weeping world. You and I are God’s answers to its pain. Let’s weep with those who weep. And let’s weep for those who aren’t concerned enough to weep. God can convict them, and He often uses world events go draw people to Himself. You have a big role to fill. Let’s do it with moist eyes. They weep as they go to plant their seed, but they sing as they return with harvest (Paslm 126:6, NLT).

Jesus’ Great Commossion A.D. 2020

In most ways, the Great Commission has not changes in two thousand years: the meeting, the man, the men (successive generations of Christians), and the mission – all remain the same. But the means! That is wheremany churches and ministries, are advancing the Gospel of Jesus Christ around the world as never before. The majority of this month’s blog is devoted to how we are keeping the world in focus as we seek to deliver the Good News at home and around the world.

Sometimes I wonder what the apostle Paul, and his co-laborers in the Gospel, would think about the technologies at my disposal today. The rest of this year, churches across America have been closed for months as a way to promote “social distancing” and prevent the spread of Covid-19.

Therefore, we moved church online. Moving the church to the internet bettered the church. We are able too hit millions of homes in seconds. So, devil hasn’t stopped anything. With the internet we can see each other face to face. Yet the Word of God are being experienced by tens of thousands of people around the world. Our churches members plus thousands more in other cities and countries via the internet. And here’s what happened, the Coronavirus pandemic has spawned a new ara of creativity. Churches and ministries like ours are coming up with never befored imagined ways to share the World of God. Obstacles have become opportunities! I have no doubt that, once the limitations on group meetings are lifted, we will continue to be use some of the current creative means on a permanent basis.

That’s what fulfilling the Great Commission in 2020 and beyond is all about, using every God-honoring means available to us to preach and teach the Wod of God znd deliever the gospel to the whole world. Only a little over one-fourth of the world’s population today.

Overcoming the Spirit of Racism!!

With all the division in the world today, Christians stand apart as being one unified body of Christ. Because, we can still live in harmony with each other when we are in Christ. Under the Law of Moses, division and inequalities existed between men and women, between races and ethnic group, and between rich and poor. Christ went to the cross and shed His blood to eliminate those differences and bring us back together. In Him, domination no longer exists. We are all equal when we have a relationship with Jesus.

We are not a different race because of the color of our skin. We are all one race, the humanrace, Amen!

God originally made men and women to be equal. Sin affected their relationship with each other, and with God. Because we are all created in God’s image, everyone is of infinite value and worth.

We have a real problem in our country. I believe the reason we have Racial Tension in the country is because of the church. I don’t believe the church has taken the stand that the church needs to take on racism, and I want us as a church to take stand. As ambassadors for Christ, we can make our appeals for reconciliation and harmony. Because of what Jesus accomplished, now we can all be Children of God and are seen as righteous. Jesus died to redeem everyone, regardless of race, gender, or nationality. We most not think of ourselves or others as being superior or inferior. We are all free to use our gifts and talents to serve others. Jesus redeemed us from the curses of the law; now, no nationality is cursed.

Racism is pure evil and sin. Jesus came to redeem all from the spirits of inferiority and superiority. Because of what He did, we can all stand on equal ground.

Genesis 1:26-28, 31 > And God said, Let Us make man in OUR image, after OUR likeness: and let them have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and the cattle, and over all the earth, over every creeping thing that creepeth upon the earth. So God created man in His image, in the image of God created he him; male and female created he them. And God blessed them, and God said unto them, Be fruitful, and multiply, and replenish the earth, and sundue it: and have dominion over the fish of the sea, and over the fowl of the air, and over every thing that moveth upon the earth…

And God saw everything that he had made, and behold, it was very good.

2 Corinthians 5:16-21 (AMPC) Consequently, from now on we estimate and regard no one from [purely] a human point of view [in terms of national standards of values]. [NO] even though we once did estimate Christ from a human viewpoints and as a man, yet now [we have such knowledge of Him that] we know Him no longer [in terms of the flesh]. Therefore if any person is [ingrafted] in Christ (the Messiah) he is a new cration (a creature altogether); the old [pervious moral and spiritual condition] has passed away. Behold, the flesh and new has come! But all things are from God, Who through Jesus Christ reconciled us to Himself [received us into favor, brought us into harmony with Himself] and gave to us the ministry of reconciliation by the word and deed we might aim to bring others into harmony with Him]. It was God [personally present] in Christ, reconciliation (of the restoration to favor). So we are Christ’s ambassadors, God making His appeal as it were through us. We as Christ’s representatives beg you for His sake to pay hold of thr divine favor now offered to you and be reconciled to God. For our sake He made Christ [virtually] to be sin Who knew no sin, so that in, AND through Himwe might become [endured with, viewed as being in, and examples of] the righteousness of God [what we ought to be, approved and acceptable and in right relationship with Him, by His goodness]

Acts 17:25-28 > Neither is worshipped with men’s hands, as through he needed any thing, seeing he giveth to all life, and breath, and all things; And hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the time before appointed, and the bounds of their habitation; That they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him, and find him, though he be not far from every one of us: For in him we live, and move, and have our being; certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.

We all have one Divine Creator, in our Heavenly Father. There is only race that’s the human race. Or you wish to call is humankind. God has made us all one. We are His creation and the body of Christ.

2 Corinthians 5:14-20 > For the love of Christ constraineth us; because we thus judge, that one died for all, the were all dead: And that he died for them, and rose again. Wherefore henceforth know we no man after flesh: yea, though we know Christ after the flesh, yet now henceforth know we h8m no more. Therefore if any man be in Christ, he is a new creature: old things are passed away; behold, all things are become new. And all things are of God, who hath reconciled us to himself by Jesus Christ, and hath given to us the ministry of reconciliation; To wit, that God was!s in Christ reconciling the world unto himself, not imputing their trespasses unto them; and hath committed unto the word of reconciliation. Now then we ambassadors for Christ, as though God did beseech you by us: we pray you in Christ’s stead, be ye reconciled to God.

With all the division in the world today. Christians stand apart as being one unified body of Christ. Because of the finished works of Jesus Christ, believers can all stand on equal ground regardless of who we are. Despite our differences, we can still live in harmony with each other when we are in Christ. Under the Law of Moses, division’s  and inequalities existed between men and women, between races and ethnic groups, and between rich and poor. Christ went to the cross and shed His blood to eliminate those differences and bring us back together. In Him, domination no longer exists. We are all equal when we have a relationship with Jesus.

In the Old Testament, inequality was normal. Jewish males were the only ones permitted to receive privileges. When Jesus came, He changes all that. He made a point of  ministering to the Gentiles and the outcasts; He deliberately included women in His ministry, thereby elevating their status. Because of what Jesus did, everyone – not just one small segment of society – has access to God and all the benefits, privileges, and freedoms that come with a relationship with Him. He erased the divisions between Gentiles and Jews, between slaves and free, and between men and women. Despite our differences, our faith in Jesus makes us all one and puts us on equal ground. We are all equal in Our Fathers eye.